Apple’s Siri Vs. Google’s Now : The showdown


The war between Apple and Google for a very good share in the smart phone market is no more news to those who are Tech savvy or at least care about devices they spend so much on.

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Recently Google released the 4.1 update of the Android OS nicknamed ‘Jelly Bean’ (I don’t really know why they name things this way…. #Illuminati (˘̯˘ ) ) and Apple introduced the iOS 5. They both have a very innovative feature which allows users to do a voice search right on their device (People like me can now search for  ‘Shokolobangoshe’ ‘Sokoti Alagbede orun’ abbl \\(^_^)// )

So Google named theirs ‘Now’ and Apple named theirs ‘Siri’ (Do you know the meaning of this? No? me neither. #Illuminati -_-), so the main purpose of this feature is suppose to make things easier for the ‘searcher’ or the ‘searchee’ (Is ‘searchee’ even a real word? We delve further -__- )

So the people at PCworld.com decided to put both of them to the test, just to know who delivered on this promise more perfectly. The video below shows:

Just in case you can’t view the video here is an excerpt of it [from PCworld.com]:

Question 1: “Where Is the Empire State Building?”

Empire state of mind 😀

Siri seemed to have trouble understanding this question, while Jelly Bean produced a map that gave us the address of the Empire State Building in New York. For now, Android has the upper hand when it comes to locating famous buildings.

Winner: Android Jelly Bean

Question 2: “Will I Need an Umbrella on Sunday?”

Err…

The first few times we asked this question, Siri gave us directions to the nearest department stores. We believe that it may have been trying to point us to places that sold umbrellas, rather than answering our weather question.

When Siri finally realized that we were asking about the weather, it informed us that it could not predict what the weather would be on Sunday, and showed us a graphic displaying the local weather forecast for the next five days. Android told us that we wouldn’t need an umbrella on Sunday, and also produced a five-day forecast.

Winner: Android Jelly Bean

Question 3: “Show Me Pictures of Mount Rushmore”

Rushmore

Android automatically brought up a small grid of images, while Siri asked if we wanted to perform a Web search. Siri finally showed us what we had asked for, but it required an extra step.

Winner: Android Jelly Bean

Question 4: “Where Can I Get a Taco Around Here?”

Yum

Siri, which pulls its results from Yelp, brought up 20 restaurants in the area that had tacos on the menu. Android presented a map of places that served tacos, but only one establishment was nearby; the rest were spread throughout the city. We have to hand it to Siri on this one, due to the number of results and owing to how close they were to our approximate location.

Winner: Apple Siri

Question 5: “What’s the Capital of Canada?”

Is it Ottawa or Columbia?

Both phones came up with an answer, but Android was faster at fetching a result.

Winner: Android Jelly Bean

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They asked more and more questions, but my aim is not to bore you *coughs*, so You can view the rest here, if you are interested in finding out more.

So what are your thoughts on this fierce war raging between Google and Apple on the smartphone scene, please leave a comment down there 😀

N.B: Please check out also polls here

*logs off*

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Presenting the TOP 5 Android Phones


Galaxy Nexus

Samsung Galaxy Nexus

The best Android phone to date, the Galaxy Nexus dazzles with its curved display, sleek design, fast performance, and, of course, the Ice Cream Sandwich update.

Epic Touch 4G

Samsung Epic Touch 4G

The slim and speedy Samsung Epic Touch 4G is excellent for gaming, Web browsing and watching video, but the plasticky design feels a bit on the cheap side.

HTC Evo 3D

HTC Evo 3D

Uneven call quality doesn’t stop the Evo 3D from being the best phone currently available on Sprint.

HTC Rezound

HTC Rezound

If you can deal with subpar battery life, the HTC Rezound is an excellent phone that won’t feel outdated anytime soon.

Tmobile MyTouch

T-Mobile MyTouch 4G Slide

The MyTouch 4G Slide has one of the best cameras we’ve ever tested–and the rest of the phone is pretty amazing as well.

Presented above are the top 5 android applications, you can visit PCWorld for full list and reviews. This is for those trying to make a decision on what to buy, enjoy 🙂

Preparing your Website for IE 9


IE 9

IE9

Websites designed to take advantage of the unique features in Internet Explorer 9 provide an immersive user experience that can increase customer loyalty and drive traffic. To obtain these benefits, though, you’ll need to optimize your site to capitalize on IE 9.

The latest flagship browser from Microsoft is more than just an incremental update. It offers unprecedented integration between Windows and the Web, essentially extending the desktop experience to include the Web itself.

As our use of the Web has evolved, more people are embracing cloud-based applications such as GmailBox.net, and Mint.com. The experience of using sites like these is more like using a traditional desktop application, though the application lives out on the Web. IE 9 can provide a similar type of interactive experience for any Website. To start, any user can get this integration simply by dragging a Website icon to the Windows 7 task bar, just as you might with any software application.

Pinning a site to the task bar makes it more visible and directly accessible for the user. But to give users a reason to want to pin your site to the task bar–and more importantly, to give them the means to interact with your site as if it were an application installed on their local PC–you need to take advantage of Jump Lists, a Windows 7 feature that displays menu options for jumping directly to specific functions, or for accessing frequently or recently used features.

CREATING WEBSITES TARGETED AT IE 9 USERS

Pinning Facebook to the Windows 7 task bar provides little more than a simple shortcut to the site, but LinkedIn and Windows Live deliver a more integrated experience resembling a locally installed software application like Outlook. Adding Jump List tasks to your site is relatively simple, so why not give your visitors a reason to pin your site to their task bar?

Here’s a code snippet on how to do it

<META name=”msapplication-task”

content=”name=Task 1;action-uri=http://host/Page1.html;icon-uri=http://host/icon1.ico”/>

<META name=”msapplication-task”

content=”name=Task 2;action-uri=http://microsoft.com/Page2.html;icon-uri=http://host/icon2.ico”/>

Smple Jump List

Sample


MOVING FORWARD

Your Website can also add Jump List categories that extend its functionality beyond the five Jump List tasks. The Jump List categories allow you to go directly to such destinations as files, documents, or URLs. You can use SiteMode APIs to create a custom Jump List category with links that are unique to each specific user, such as a personal profile page.

The Jump List categories enable your site to deliver dynamic information to users even when they’re not actively engaged on the site. You can use this capability to provide access to user-specific history such as sites visited or files opened, or you can use it for alerts and notifications about activity related to the site–for example, new messages received or upcoming events.

To create a custom Jump List category, you must go through the following stages, as explained in Hilerio’s document:

Category Creation

First call the method for creating a custom category label. The example code shown below creates a custom category named ‘List1’. You have to call this method at least once before using any of the other methods associated with creating custom Jump List category actions. The category label won’t appear until the Jump List category is populated with at least one item.

window.external.msSiteModeCreateJumplist(‘List1’);

Item Creation

The example code below illustrates how to create three Jump List category list items named ‘Item1’, ‘Item2’, and ‘Item3’. The name parameter is followed first by a parameter defining the URL that the item will navigate to, and then by a parameter specifying the icon to display for the given item.

window.external.msSiteModeAddJumpListItem(‘Item 1’, ‘http://host/Item1.html&#8217;, ‘http://host/images/item1.ico&#8217;);
window.external.msSiteModeAddJumpListItem(‘Item 2’, ‘http://host/Item2.html&#8217;, ‘http://host/images/item2.ico&#8217;);
window.external.msSiteModeAddJumpListItem(‘Item 3’, ‘Item3.html’, ‘images/item3.ico’);

List Display

The preceding code creates the items for the list, but it does not display them. Use the following sample code to display the in-memory list of items on the actual Jump List:

window.external.msSiteModeShowJumplist();

Clear List

If the Jump List category is populated with site history or recent activities, those actions may expire. You can use the following code to clear the items from the custom Jump List category:

window.external.msSiteModeClearJumplist();

You can also add alerts to the Jump List for your Website.You can use the methods shown here to create and populate a custom Jump List category for your site. You can arrange to display a maximum of 12 items at one time in a custom category. Duplicate items are ignored; items that exceed the maximum or that don’t fit on the display due to resolution or font-size variations are not displayed.

Display Overlay Icons

One of the best features of IE 9 on Windows 7 is its ability to display an overlay icon on the pinned-site taskbar button. Why is the display overlay icon so important? Because a pinned site may be sitting idle, hidden by other sites or applications. The overlay icon gives you a way to display dynamic content or updates of things that are going on behind the scenes that may catch users’ attention and drive them to action.

You could display a small bell indicating an event or appointment, or an envelope icon to let the user know that a new message has arrived. The overlay icon appears in the lower-right corner of the pinned-site task bar button. The overlay icons are not visible if the site is not opened, however, or if the site is not actually pinned to the task bar.

The following code sample adds overlay1.ico on top of the associated task bar button for the pinned site, and includes a hover-over tool tip identifying the overlay icon with the string ‘Overlay 1’:

window.external.msSiteModeSetIconOverlay(‘http://host/images/overlay1.ico&#8217;, ‘Overlay 1’);

To clear the overlay icon, use the following code:

window.external.msSiteModeClearIconOverlay();

This series of examples is just a drop in the bucket. Check out Microsoft’s Internet Explorer 9 Guide for Developers for comprehensive coverage of the unique features of IE 9 and explanations of how to customize your Website to take advantage of them.

Bear in mind, though, that IE 9 is compatible only with Windows 7 and Windows Vista, meaning that your IE 9 customizations will be worthless for two out of three PCs. Keep things in perspective, and don’t go overboard investing time and effort to cater to this one browser.

Because businesses are slow to upgrade, consumers are leading the charge toward adopting Windows 7 and Internet Explorer 9. Consequently, these changes will have a direct impact with how the general public interacts with your site.

If your site targets average consumers, you should explore and take advantage of the unique features of IE 9. You don’t have to be an expert programmer, and you don’t have to redesign your entire Website to give your visitors a reason to pin your site to their task bar–and from there to deliver a more immersive, application-like experience.

Post dubbed from 🙂 :

PC World

PC World

Chrome OS on the Move


Chrome

Chrome OS

Google’s Chrome operating system for netbooks has been in the works for a while, but the company finally seems ready for a May launch. The company launched a stable developer channel for Chrome OS last week, fueling speculation that devices with the software would be announced in May at Google I/O conference, possibly shipping by summer, as the company previously promised.

Google Chrome OS debuted almost two years ago and is an open-source operating system geared towards netbooks — the hottest-selling computers until the iPad arrived. After some delays, Google said Chrome OS devices would hit store shelves by mid-2011, a deadline rapidly approaching.

Some had a chance to test Chrome OS for the past few months via Google’s ownCR48 Chrome netbook, a hardware and software developer testbed before the arrival of mass-produced third-party hardware. The CR48 has a has a 12.1-inch screen, a full keyboard, an oversized touchpad, world-mode 3G, 802.11 Wi-Fi, a Web cam and eight hours of active battery life.

Reviewing Chrome OS and the CR48 laptopPCWorld‘s Edward Albro wrote “I don’t expect using the Chrome OS to be a revolutionary experience. Instead, it feels a bit more like working with one hand tied to your side — it’s possible, but awkward.” He notes, however, some advantages of Chrome OS versus netbooks running Windows, such as 15-second boot, longer battery life, and simplicity.

But with the iPad probably the hottest consumer device right now, do Chrome OS netbooks stand a chance? They could, if the price is lower: for example, Asus is rumored to launch a sub-$250 Chrome netbook, targeted for people who want to use basic productivity applications or browse the Web. That’s almost half the starting price of an iPad, and could be a tempting proposition for customers.

Meanwhile, Hewlett-Packard, Lenovo, and Toshiba, original Google partners for Chrome OS, have yet to announce any products, let alone pricing and availability, for any netbooks running the browser-centric OS.

Brought to you courtesy of

PC World

PC World

Windows 8 in the making


Microsoft Windows 8

Just hours after an early build of Microsoft’s new Windows 8 operating system leaked we’re starting to get a good idea of how the latest version of Windows is shaping up.

Intrepid users have already begun mining the build and a major departure besides the OS’s new welcome screen is already evident. Microsoft seems to have replaced the toolbar in the explorer window with the Ribbon user interface currently used Microsoft Office programs, including Word, Excel, and PowerPoint.

Ribbon-Like

Once you’ve logged in, the most noticeable change to Windows is the new Ribbon interface on every Explorer window. At this stage, the Ribbon UI is in a pretty confused state and doesn’t seem to have some of its functionality, so it’s hard to tell exactly how successful this switch will be. Within Windowseven suggests some disagreement may exist within Microsoft about using the new interface at all.

Also unclear is whether this change is permanent for all devices. The current build of Windows 8 has a toggle to return the toolbar and menus we’ve all grown accustomed to, but it’s not clear whether this will make it to the final version of Windows 8 or if it’s just a temporary measure while the design of the Ribbon gets ironed out.

Explorer

Sneak peek into Windows 8 from pcworld

Firefox 4 Beats IE 9 [K.O.]


IE 9 Vs Firefox 4

IE 9 Vs Firefox 4

Users downloaded nearly 7 million copies of the new Firefox 4 in the 24 hours since its launch yesterday, Mozilla’s running tally claimed.

That number was almost triple the 2.4 million copies of Internet Explorer 9 (IE9) that Microsoft claimed were downloaded in its browser’s first day of availability last week. (Also see “Browser Feature War: IE9 vs Firefox 4 vs Chrome 9.”)

Mozilla officially launched Firefox 4 Tuesday at around 10:00 a.m. EDT, bagging an even million in the first three hours. According to Mozilla’s real-time calculator , about 6.5 million copies of Firefox 4 had been downloaded by 10:00 a.m. Wednesday.

But while Firefox 4’s first-day count trounced IE9’s, it fell short of the record established by Firefox 3.0 in mid-2008 when that browser was downloaded more than 8 million times. Then, Mozilla had pushed for a Guinness World Record with a “Download Day” campaign that urged users to flood its servers with requests. Firefox’s Guinness record still stands.

Mozilla

Not surprisingly, Firefox 4 is doing best in Europe, long a Mozilla stronghold.

Of the 7.6 million downloads counted by 11:30 a.m. ET, 44 percent went to users in Europe, while North America accounted for 26 percent. Asia came in third, with 20%, with South America, Africa and Oceania all in single digits.

Read all about it here