Chrome OS on the Move


Chrome

Chrome OS

Google’s Chrome operating system for netbooks has been in the works for a while, but the company finally seems ready for a May launch. The company launched a stable developer channel for Chrome OS last week, fueling speculation that devices with the software would be announced in May at Google I/O conference, possibly shipping by summer, as the company previously promised.

Google Chrome OS debuted almost two years ago and is an open-source operating system geared towards netbooks — the hottest-selling computers until the iPad arrived. After some delays, Google said Chrome OS devices would hit store shelves by mid-2011, a deadline rapidly approaching.

Some had a chance to test Chrome OS for the past few months via Google’s ownCR48 Chrome netbook, a hardware and software developer testbed before the arrival of mass-produced third-party hardware. The CR48 has a has a 12.1-inch screen, a full keyboard, an oversized touchpad, world-mode 3G, 802.11 Wi-Fi, a Web cam and eight hours of active battery life.

Reviewing Chrome OS and the CR48 laptopPCWorld‘s Edward Albro wrote “I don’t expect using the Chrome OS to be a revolutionary experience. Instead, it feels a bit more like working with one hand tied to your side — it’s possible, but awkward.” He notes, however, some advantages of Chrome OS versus netbooks running Windows, such as 15-second boot, longer battery life, and simplicity.

But with the iPad probably the hottest consumer device right now, do Chrome OS netbooks stand a chance? They could, if the price is lower: for example, Asus is rumored to launch a sub-$250 Chrome netbook, targeted for people who want to use basic productivity applications or browse the Web. That’s almost half the starting price of an iPad, and could be a tempting proposition for customers.

Meanwhile, Hewlett-Packard, Lenovo, and Toshiba, original Google partners for Chrome OS, have yet to announce any products, let alone pricing and availability, for any netbooks running the browser-centric OS.

Brought to you courtesy of

PC World

PC World

iPad 2 [Latest Rumours]


iPad 2

iPad 2

With Apple’s iPad 2 event less than 48 hours away, the rumor mill is spinning faster than ever. What’s the wisdom of the Web predicting? A thinner, lighter iPad with at least one camera and beefier hardware.

The consensus is that iPad 2 will be more of an evolution than a revolution from the original iPad, of which Apple has sold more than 15 million.

As usual, Apple has been disciplined about not releasing any information before their big press event. That has led the Web to spend much of its time digging, speculating and daydreaming about what may be coming. Some of the rumors make more sense than others, but as always, you should take them with a pinch of salt.

thinner and lighter iPad 2 is almost a sure bet. Apple likes to shave the fat off its mobile devices with every iteration, and with complaints that the iPad can be too heavy when held up for a longer time, a more svelte iPad 2 is very likely. Also, brace yourself, as there might be a white version of the iPad 2 as well (though given that the company still hasn’t managed to ship a white iPhone, a white iPad may be too much to hope for).

The iPad 2 could also have a slightly thinner screen bezel, though the screen is likely to remain unchanged at 9.7-inches. A flat back design and larger, stereo speakers are also very likely developments for the iPad 2. Despite previous rumors, the consensus seems to be that there won’t be a Retina display on the iPad 2, but rather a screen that matches the original iPad’s 1024×768 resolution.

iPad 1

iPad 1

It’s very likely Apple will integrate a front-facing camera on the iPad 2 so users can do video chats. But opinions are split over whether we will see a camera on the back too. Other likely hardware changes include a faster A5 dual-core processor and 512MB or 1GB of RAM, as well as a dual-mode GSM CDMA chip inside the 3G iPad 2. The original iPad has a 1GHz A4 processor and 256MB of RAM.

Read full story here

 

 

Google’s Top Searches of 2010


Google

Another year is coming to a close and with it the endless parade of year-in-review articles rehashing the triumphs and tragedies of 2010. We’ve already seen Yahoo’s top searches of 2010 showing that Yahoos this year were most concerned with the BP Oil Spill, World Cup in South Africa, Miley Cyrus, Kim Kardashian and Lady Gaga. Now it’s Google’s turn with a look at what its millions of users have been interested in this past year.

World cup

You can find the complete list at Google’s Zeitgeist page that includes an HTML 5-based interactive visualization of Google’s yearly search data. The search giant has also included its typical wide ranging categories for newscelebritiesentertainmenthomemakingsportsscience and technology,humanitycitiesYouTube videos and even a quirky section that highlights the weirdest searches of 2010.

Here’s a look at some of the highlights from Google’s Zeitgeist 2010.

Top 5 Global Events

1. World Cup

2. Vancouver Olympics

3. Haiti Earthquake

4. BP Oil Spill

5. Ash Cloud

Vuvuzelas and Maple Leaves topped the world’s most-searched events this year thanks to the World Cup in South Africa and the Olympics in Vancouver. Two tragedies–the earthquake in Haiti and the BP oil spill–took the third and fourth spots. And rounding out the top 5 global events on Google was the Icelandic ash cloud that halted air travel across Europe for several days and stranded over five million travelers in airports across the continent. Notable events missing from the top 5 included the Pakistan floods, earthquake in China and the Chilean miner rescue.

Fastest Rising (Global)

1. Chatroulette

2. iPad

3. Justin Bieber

4. Nicki Minaj

5. Friv

6. Myxer

7. Katy Perry

8. Twitter

9. Gamezer

10. Facebook

iPad

It turns out 2010 wasn’t the year of the tablet, but the year of Chatroulette. The Webcam-powered random chat service that connected users with strangers–and frequently led to X-rated encounters–topped the iPad as the fastest rising Google search worldwide. Apple’s iPad was next, followed by the Canadian teen sensation Justin Bieber, Trinidadian hip hop artist Nicki Minaj, gaming site Friv, mobile phone ringtone and wallpaper provider Myxer, Katy Perry, Twitter, Gamezer and Facebook.

Read more here

What a Dead List!!


I am sure you have heard of the man who saw tomorrow, this hilarious list was compiled by some people who are seeing the past, enjoy!!


Wired Editor in Chief Chris Anderson is catching flack for the magazine’s current cover story, which declares that the Web is dead. I’m not sure what the controversy is. For years, once-vibrant technologies, products, and companies have been dropping like teenagers in a Freddy Krueger movie. Thank heavens that tech journalists have done such a good job of documenting the carnage as it happened. Without their diligent reporting, we might not be aware that the industry is pretty much an unrelenting bloodbath.

After the jump, a moving recap of some of the stuff that predeceased the Web–you may want to bring a handkerchief.

Internet Explorer, as you’ll recall, died in 2004.

Internet explorer

After a long illness, Print was declared dead in April.

Good old e-mailing

By 2007, Microsoft Office had bit the big one.

Office

The iPod definitely died last year.

Ipod finally laid to rest

We also mourned the loss of RSS.

Who uses this thing?

And there were horrible rumors that Twitter had been…murdered.

Twitter dead or alive!!

The netbook croaked in April.

Ipad murdered them all!!

Linux absolutely, positively died in 2006.

Linux laid in state

The desktop may or may not have died last year, but boy, it didn’t look good.

Browsers---"The new Desktops in town"

Pheww!! In conclusion all i’d say is that:

>> Technology comes and technology goes.

>> The gap between old releases and new ones is growing thin per second.

Technology has become an integral part of our lives, adopted by many as a basic necessity of living……….We can never have enough of them…….Get ready for more!!

Read more here: http://technologizer.com/2010/08/18/the-tragic-death-of-practically-everything/

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