Chrome OS on the Move


Chrome

Chrome OS

Google’s Chrome operating system for netbooks has been in the works for a while, but the company finally seems ready for a May launch. The company launched a stable developer channel for Chrome OS last week, fueling speculation that devices with the software would be announced in May at Google I/O conference, possibly shipping by summer, as the company previously promised.

Google Chrome OS debuted almost two years ago and is an open-source operating system geared towards netbooks — the hottest-selling computers until the iPad arrived. After some delays, Google said Chrome OS devices would hit store shelves by mid-2011, a deadline rapidly approaching.

Some had a chance to test Chrome OS for the past few months via Google’s ownCR48 Chrome netbook, a hardware and software developer testbed before the arrival of mass-produced third-party hardware. The CR48 has a has a 12.1-inch screen, a full keyboard, an oversized touchpad, world-mode 3G, 802.11 Wi-Fi, a Web cam and eight hours of active battery life.

Reviewing Chrome OS and the CR48 laptopPCWorld‘s Edward Albro wrote “I don’t expect using the Chrome OS to be a revolutionary experience. Instead, it feels a bit more like working with one hand tied to your side — it’s possible, but awkward.” He notes, however, some advantages of Chrome OS versus netbooks running Windows, such as 15-second boot, longer battery life, and simplicity.

But with the iPad probably the hottest consumer device right now, do Chrome OS netbooks stand a chance? They could, if the price is lower: for example, Asus is rumored to launch a sub-$250 Chrome netbook, targeted for people who want to use basic productivity applications or browse the Web. That’s almost half the starting price of an iPad, and could be a tempting proposition for customers.

Meanwhile, Hewlett-Packard, Lenovo, and Toshiba, original Google partners for Chrome OS, have yet to announce any products, let alone pricing and availability, for any netbooks running the browser-centric OS.

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Latest Windows Rival to be????


Start menu

Google’s Chrome OS is still on track for a holiday launch, and could be released in one month.

TechCrunch’s MG Siegler has been snooping around the bug comments on Google’s Code site and discovered that developers recently hit the Release Candidate milestone. The OS is now on version 0.9.78.1, and this number will, in all likelihood, count up to version 1.0 for launch.Another discussion thread has references to a release date, with one employee saying “We will push this after November 11.”

In other words, Chrome OS will probably ship or see its first product launch on November 11. Either way, Google confirmed that Chrome OS is still coming in 2010. “We are very happy with the progress of Google Chrome OS and expect devices will be available later this year,” the company said in a statement to TechCrunch.

Chrome’s Application menu. (Click to zoom.)Google announced Chrome OS in June 2009, and first demonstrated the concept the following November. Essentially, Chrome OS is an operating system stripped of everything but a modified Chrome web browser, with no installed programs and minimal internal storage. It’s initially intended for netbooks, but could potentially work with notebooks, desktops and maybe tablets.

Desktop

 

Chrome OS seemed like an intriguing possibility a year ago, but these days, any discussion of the operating system tends to question its relevance in light of Android’s rapid growth. I’ve always believed that Chrome OS has a chance, but I’ll concede that it’s going to be a long haul.

For Google, the challenge will be to create an exciting enough app ecosystem for Chrome OS and, at the same time, to release hardware that is faster, cheaper and more secure than any Windows notebook. Google is building a Chrome Web app store, with games like Lego Star Wars and a payment system, but that’s just half the equation. Without attractive hardware, Google will have a harder time selling its cloud computing revolution.

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But how cost effective is this OS going to be? considering the fact that it’s going to need a broadband internet connection to work, hmmm anyone?

Well let’s see how it goes, as for me i can’t wait to see what it looks like, when it is finally released, till then ……………..

Firefox Falls Further Behind in Browser Wars



Mozilla Firefox

You need so many browsers because none of them is perfect. And, Chrome comes closer to perfection than Firefox does. Since Google released the Chrome browser, Linux users have converted to it by the hundreds of thousands. Although Firefox claims millions of downloads, you can bet that its usage is not close to the number of downloads.

Maybe you’ve seen stories declaring, as Keir Thomas did on this blog last year, that Firefox is dead while Chrome looks increasingly like a better choice. But why is Firefox taking all this abuse? In short, because its alleged strengths are its greatest weaknesses.

Firefox fans tout the browser’s use of extensions, or add-ons, as one of its many boastworthy features, but if you’ve ever connected to a site that uses some new Web feature that Firefox doesn’t support, you’re out of luck. Those same extensions often break other extensions on the way in during installation.

Further, why should a user constantly download and install extensions for such common Web gadgetry as Flash or PDF? Why aren’t those extensions included by default if their inclusion is necessary for a rich Web experience?

How often has Firefox notified you at startup that there are updates for one or more of your extensions that result in no updates, or that upon updating, you’ll have to restart your browser only to find that the extension update broke your browser. This exercise is time-consuming and tedious. It’s almost as bad as patching and rebooting a Windows system. You find that simply opening your browser to check stock prices becomes so involved that you forget why you originally opened it.

But Firefox extensions aren’t the only problem. Firefox is also so notoriously slow that on older systems, it’s almost unusable or it takes so long to open that you find yourself clicking the icon multiple times, thinking that your original launch didn’t take for some reason.

Chrome, however, is usable and responsive. Now you understand why Firefox might not survive the browser wars. Its extension model is annoying to use, it’s slow on older systems, it’s slower than Chrome on any system, and its extensions break other extensions.

Read more here: Click me please!!

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What is your favorite Browser? Find out Here


Browser war

Browser Wars

Of all the software on your PC, the Web browser may be the most important tool you use each day–but you may not give it much thought. The difference between a merely good browser and a great one, however, can be vast. The best browsers are those that stay out of your way: When you’re in the right browser, you feel as though you’re alone with your favorite site. The browser loads pages quickly, without crashing, and it can deftly handle any Web page you visit without prompting you to do anything extra.

But there’s more to a browser than just that. To satisfy power users, it must support a multitude of add-ons and extensions. It must be customizable. And to protect you online, it should do a good job of catching and blocking potential security threats–such as phishing or cross-site scripting attacks–and be resistant to malware.

We put the top five browsersInternet ExplorerFirefoxChromeSafari, and Opera–through an exhaustive set of lab-based tests and subjective examinations to see exactly how they stack up in terms of interface, security, extras, and speed.

User Interface

Browser interfaces all follow the same basic formula. Within those constraints, though, browsers exhibit some notable differences.

First off, you can tell quite a bit about a company’s approach to product development just by its browser interfaces. Apple’s Safari has a fair amount of fit and finish, for example. Google’s Chrome is spartan and unadorned, and Mozilla’s Firefox interface is usable but feels dated compared with newer competitors.

Slim is in. Most browsers now sport more-streamlined looks, with fewer, narrower toolbars–and in many cases on Windows, no menu bar to speak of. This sort of layout typically works well, since it usually includes a couple of drop-down menus in the toolbar that give you easy access to the browser’s features.

Firefox, Chrome, and Opera all let you apply different skins to the toolbars. Generally I find it pretty simple to locate and change skins in each of these browsers. Google, for instance, has an online repository that lets you browse and apply themes for Chrome. Mozilla has a similar site for Firefox. One nifty part of Firefox’s skins feature–called Personas–is that you can “try on” any of the skins simply by mousing over the thumbnails on the Personas site. In Opera, meanwhile, you browse themes from within a control pane in the app itself; that works okay, but the pane isn’t quite as easy to browse as the Chrome and Firefox skins galleries are.

We based our evaluation here on the ease of use, polish, flexibility, and layout of each browser’s interface. We also looked at whether the interface got in the user’s way too much, or whether it allowed Websites to take center stage.

In all, I vote for Google Chrome, because of simplicity of use and speed, what about you? let me know your vote, i think it counts.

Read more here: pcworld.com

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