Apple Patents Anti-Sexting Device


Apple image

Today the US Patent and Trademark Office approved a patent Apple filed in 2008, which, get this, prevents users from sending or receiving “objectionable” text messages.  The patent’s official title? “Text-based communication control for personal communication device” which actually doesn’t use the pretty ridiculous noun/verb“Sexting,” but come on, we all know what they mean.

The “Sexting” patent background info states that the problem it solves is that there is currently “No way to monitor and control text communications to make them user appropriate. For example, users such as children may send or receive messages (intentionally or not) with parentally objectionable language.”

And the patent itself:

In one embodiment, the control application includes a parental control application. The parental control application evaluates whether or not the communication contains approved text based on, for example, objective ratings criteria or a user’s age or grade level, and, if unauthorized, prevents such text from being included in the text-based communication.

If the control contains unauthorized text, the control application may alert the user, the administrator or other designated individuals of the presence of such text. The control application may require the user to replace the unauthorized text or may automatically delete the text or the entire communication.

Ladies and gentlemen this means that Jobs and company have just sealed the deal on a solution to the number one fear of parents across America, kids sending “unauthorized texts.” As it looks like whatever algorithm or control the system is comprised of will basically censor the transmission of R-rated content on iPhones, is this the first sign of the end of “Sexting” as we know it?

Yes and no, as those interesting in “Sexting” will probably find some clever workaround to express how much they want to bang, screw, hit it or a myriad of other words that don’t immediately set off the censorship sensors.

On a positive note, it looks like whatever it is preventing kids from sending salacious texts will also help them learn languages, just not the perverted words.

By Alexia Tsotsis of techCrunch

And courtesy of e-Sacarsm “What Steve Jobs must have been like as a Kid!”

Steve Jobs Child

Advertisements

Latest Windows Rival to be????


Start menu

Google’s Chrome OS is still on track for a holiday launch, and could be released in one month.

TechCrunch’s MG Siegler has been snooping around the bug comments on Google’s Code site and discovered that developers recently hit the Release Candidate milestone. The OS is now on version 0.9.78.1, and this number will, in all likelihood, count up to version 1.0 for launch.Another discussion thread has references to a release date, with one employee saying “We will push this after November 11.”

In other words, Chrome OS will probably ship or see its first product launch on November 11. Either way, Google confirmed that Chrome OS is still coming in 2010. “We are very happy with the progress of Google Chrome OS and expect devices will be available later this year,” the company said in a statement to TechCrunch.

Chrome’s Application menu. (Click to zoom.)Google announced Chrome OS in June 2009, and first demonstrated the concept the following November. Essentially, Chrome OS is an operating system stripped of everything but a modified Chrome web browser, with no installed programs and minimal internal storage. It’s initially intended for netbooks, but could potentially work with notebooks, desktops and maybe tablets.

Desktop

 

Chrome OS seemed like an intriguing possibility a year ago, but these days, any discussion of the operating system tends to question its relevance in light of Android’s rapid growth. I’ve always believed that Chrome OS has a chance, but I’ll concede that it’s going to be a long haul.

For Google, the challenge will be to create an exciting enough app ecosystem for Chrome OS and, at the same time, to release hardware that is faster, cheaper and more secure than any Windows notebook. Google is building a Chrome Web app store, with games like Lego Star Wars and a payment system, but that’s just half the equation. Without attractive hardware, Google will have a harder time selling its cloud computing revolution.

Read here

But how cost effective is this OS going to be? considering the fact that it’s going to need a broadband internet connection to work, hmmm anyone?

Well let’s see how it goes, as for me i can’t wait to see what it looks like, when it is finally released, till then ……………..

Oracle Vs. Google, Microsoft Vs. Motorola


Microsoft sues Motorola

Moto

Microsoft filed patent infringement complaints against Motorola and its Android phones in the International Trade Commission and U.S. federal court Friday, indicating that the software giant may hope to use its strong patent position as one way to set its mobile software apart from the competition.

Microsoft said that Motorola’s Android phones infringe nine patents, including some that would appear to threaten most smartphone platforms.Android is the open source OS built by Microsoft rival Google.

The patents appear to include some related to Microsoft Exchange ActiveSync, which syncs e-mail, calendar and contacts between a mobile phone and a software-based computer program, according to a blog post written by Horacio Gutierrez, general counsel at Microsoft.

Other patents involve technology that displays signal strength and battery power on phones.

While Google licenses Microsoft’s ActiveSync for use in Android, Microsoft may plan to argue that handset makers that add their own technologies to Android also need a license for ActiveSync, said Chris Hazelton, an analyst with The 451 Group. Motorola does add its own enhancements to Android phones.

“Motorola, of the major Android supporters, is the only one that doesn’t license ActiveSync themselves,” Hazelton said. HTC, Samsung, Sony Ericsson, Dell and others all license ActiveSync, he said.

Microsoft could also be using the lawsuit as a way to pressure Motorola into building phones using Windows Phone 7, Microsoft’s new phone operating system, Hazelton said. Though Motorola made phones using Microsoft’s operating systems in the past, it now says it is committed to Android.

Motorola may have been unwilling to license ActiveSync because it can be expensive, Hazelton said. “This is not a small amount of money. We’re talking hundreds of millions of dollars,” he said. Motorola, which is about to split up into several companies, has been struggling over the past few years.

Read more here

Oracle Sues Google

Oracle Java

Google

Oracle has filed a lawsuit against Google, charging that its Android phone software infringes Oracle patents and copyrights related to Java, Oracle said on Thursday.

“In developing Android, Google knowingly, directly and repeatedly infringed Oracle’s Java-related intellectual property. This lawsuit seeks appropriate remedies for their infringement,” Oracle spokeswoman Karen Tillman said in a statement.

The suit was filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in San Francisco and seeks a jury trial.

Google could not immediately reached for comment on the lawsuit.

Oracle acquired Sun Microsystems’ Java technology whenit bought the company earlier this year. Java is a software environment that allows applications written in Java to run on virtually any computer so long as it has a Java virtual machine installed.

When Google developed Android it included a Java compatible technology called Dalvikwith the phone OS. Dalvik was developed as a “clean room” version of Java, meaning Google built it from the ground up without using any Sun technology or intellectual property, said Gartner analyst Ken Dulaney.

“You can’t just take a Java application from a Sun environment, where it’s licensed, and run it on Android. You have to recompile it to Dalvik,” Dulaney said.

Oracle says Dalvik is a competitor to Java and infringes several of its patents, which it lists in the complaint, and its Java copyright.

It was unclear Thursday if Oracle approached Google to discuss its concerns before it filed the lawsuit.

Oracle’s motivation was probably Android’s recent success in the smartphone market, Dulaney said. “They own Sun now and they want to collect the royalties on the language,” he said.

Oracle alleges that Google was aware of its patents and “willfully and deliberately” infringed them. It also says Google hired some of Sun’s Java engineers. It wants the court to block the alleged infringement and award it damages.

Dulaney said Oracle’s case could be “hard to prove” and that a legal battle could take a long time. “What they’ll have to argue about is whether Google did a purely clean-room Java or if they have someone with inside knowledge of the code,” he said.

Dalvik is one option for writing Android applications; developers can also use HTML 5 and the C language. But Dalvik is used for some of the core Android applications, such as email, Dulaney said.

Read more here